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12/01/20: Teaching in Winter: Faculty Panel: 11:00 - 12:00 pm - Shared screen with speaker view
Alison Brauneis (she/her)
17:50
Same for David
Steve Ciesinski
21:56
For those of you who had more than 49 students (maximum to show headshots on 1 screen) did you use 2 large monitors so you wouldnt need to bounce back and forth on only 1 screen?
Doug Abbey
21:59
Becky when you cold call a group do they pick someone to respond. how does that work
Becky Lester
23:46
@Doug: I would either tell the students to pick someone up front (before the break-out room), such as "whose birthday is closest to today" so it wouldn't default to the same person over and over. Or if I didn't remember that up front, I would just call out the room number and call out the students' names, and wait for someone to speak up.
Becky Lester
25:35
@Steve: I taught from a teaching studio on campus, which was great, but I could only see 25 students at a time, even though I had between 55-60 students per session. It wasn't optimal, but it was fine. I also had a second screen set up that would show more students, so I could glance down to that screen when necessary.
Steve Ciesinski
26:19
ok, thx. I’m seriously considering getting another screen…
mike harmon
28:37
Do people find either the teaching studio or a home set-up easier or more difficult to manage from a technology standpoint?
Doug Abbey
28:49
when you ask a question but not a cold call to a large class, how do you manage the selection of who to call on
diane lee (she/her)
30:45
@Steve, if you have the latest version of the Zoom app installed you can also set a specific order of the video thumbnails so it’s a bit easier to know which students are on which “page” of the gallery
Becky Lester
31:17
The teaching studio took a decent amount of up-front time to learn, but Media Services and Elaine (on this call) helped me a lot. Once I learned the system, I loved it - and am very glad I taught from there. As David said, the students really liked it because I had a high quality camera. it also came with several existing monitors so I could see the students, see my slides, see participant list, see chat, see extra students, etc.
Becky Lester
32:08
(Sorry, as David said, the students really liked it because it felt like a classroom setting. An added benefit was that it had a high quality camera and audio, which made it easier for them to see and hear me.)
Doug Abbey
33:39
what is the best practice of the screen when you are using a Power ‘Point
Kristin Hansen
34:35
@Doug - I like to encourage students to use side-by-side mode. This way they can resize us (the lecturers) and the slides to their liking
Becky Lester
35:00
+1 to Kristin
Brandon Gipper
35:28
@Doug, I agree with Kristin. The side by side is a much nicer look from the student's perspective.
Alison Brauneis (she/her)
36:16
@Steve, if you haven’t already had a technology consultation with DS, they can help walk you through your home set up and look into how/if a second monitor may meet your needs. You can submit a request at this form: https://stanford.service-now.com/it_services?id=sc_cat_item&sys_id=5ec6d6e513443b40d11dbda12244b01b
Kristin Hansen
36:17
Other suggestions - come off slide mode when you can - let students see you full screen
Kristin Hansen
36:38
Coach students to toggle between gallery and speaker depending on what’s being viewed
Steve Ciesinski
37:32
at your first class, since you had many GSB first years, did you have everyone intro themselves to the rest of the class?
Becky Lester
40:46
I didn't have everyone introduce themselves, mostly because I think it would have taken too long (I had ~ 55-60 students per session). But I think any way to engage them and connect (such as introductions) is particularly appreciated this year.
Brandon Gipper
41:08
@Steve, I did not. The class is just over 40 students, and time was tight. Perhaps there is space for that in smaller courses?
mike harmon
46:41
What poll app/software do people find works best?
Kristin Hansen
49:38
Zoom has built-in polling
mike harmon
50:39
I heard about some using an external app so that they could keep zoom separate. Wasn’t sure if others had tried this and found a difference in manageability
Elaine C. Smith (she/her)
52:00
@Mike, we’ve heard a mix of PollEverywhere, Zoom’s native polls, and just using the Zoom reactions/nonverbals, and it depends to some extent on what sorts of polls you’d like to have and what you want to use them for. PollEverywhere is more robust and can be built into your slides but isn’t native so will require students to open a link in another window on their computer or use a mobile device.
diane lee (she/her)
52:01
@Mike Stanford has a license for Poll Everywhere. You can embed polls into your deck. https://ctl.stanford.edu/use-learning-technology/live-polling
Elaine C. Smith (she/her)
53:08
Thanks for the link, Diane!
Becky Lester
53:25
I used Poll Everywhere as well, which I liked because of some its visual features, but it definitely took a few classes to get students trained/used to having to using an external site.
Ali Yurukoglu
01:02:10
I have to run to a seminar. Thank you everyone for your insights! Very helpful.
Kristin Hansen
01:02:24
Thanks Ali!
mike harmon
01:06:05
I would love to see that Becky! I am at mpharmon@stanford.edu. Thanks
Doug Abbey
01:06:48
becky your sample slide deck which shows how you present polls and breakouts in the slide deck would be great
Alison Brauneis (she/her)
01:07:29
Sign up for a Zoom Teaching Practice Session for fully online courses: https://tlhub.stanford.edu/upcoming-events/november-2-december-9-fully-online-zoom-teaching-practice-sessions/?occurrence=2020-11-02
Alison Brauneis (she/her)
01:07:49
Thank you for coming today! We would appreciate if you take a moment to share your thoughts on this session before you leave: http://tiny.cc/Dec1FacultyPanel