Logo

SHP's Health Equity Panel 2021 - Shared screen with speaker view
Christina Oldini, CMQCC
31:51
Congratulations on the award out of The Commonwealth Club, Dr. Bibbins-Domingo!
Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo
39:28
Thank you!
Sherri Rose (she/her)
50:55
For those who joined after the introduction, we will include audience Q&A after the moderated Q&A. Please type a short version of your question into the chat or send it to me as a message. If you are a trainee, please identify yourself as one; we are prioritizing questions from trainees. We'll call on people to ask their submitted questions verbally.
Jim Salsman
51:04
Question: I've participated in at least a dozen telephone town Halls held by Stanford's Congresswoman Anna Eshoo since she started chairing the House Health Subcommittee in January 2019. While she is repeatedly reminded by constituents of the excessive cost and relative inaccessibility of health care, she seems skeptical of her party's recommendation for a public option because it would cut into health insurers profits, and many of her colleagues are heavily dependent on campaign contributions from those insurers. Worse, Congresswoman Eshoo seems to have no understanding of the universal all-payer rate setting systems of France, Germany, and Japan, where I should mention life spans are longest while ours in the U.S. have fallen over the past three years. What can the Stanford community do to inform our crucial Congresswoman of more equitable forms of healthcare finance and encourage her to support them? I would also like to know the panel's opinions on GME enrollment caps, please.
Eugene Lewit
55:53
Diversity among physician in US seems to have increased quite a bit in recent years. Do we see any impact on disparities?
Josh Salomon
57:49
(‘Vintage’ trainee here…): Dr. Artiga and Dr. Bibbins-Domingo both highlighted the importance of improving data systems related to equity and disparities. Could the panelists comment on what they see as the federal role in improving data (e.g. in terms of advancing data standards, funding data infrastructure) and what you see as prospects for serious improvements in this area, in view of the Build Back Better package (where funding for data infrastructure is largely absent), or other efforts to build a more muscular pandemic preparedness infrastructure more generally.
Michele Barry
01:00:13
Petra—in this country often high income educated parents do not immunize their children—in fact only 55 percent of eligible children in the US have been HPV immunized far below Sweden’s numbers(but affordability and access obviously play a role)—Is there a contingent in Sweden in high income vociferous angst vaccine. In addition Rwanda where 92 percent of girls are immunized income doe not play a role it appears collective trust does.
Sherri Rose (she/her)
01:04:00
For those who joined after the introduction, we will include audience Q&A after the moderated Q&A. Please type a short version of your question into the chat or send it to me as a message. If you are a trainee, please identify yourself as one; we are prioritizing questions from trainees. We'll call on people to ask their submitted questions verbally. We are not using the “raise hand” feature given the number of attendees.
Jim Salsman
01:07:32
For those unfamiliar with how to refer the homeless into the Santa Clara County system, please see https://bit.ly/scc-homeless-intake Does anyone have a similar flowchart for San Francisco?
Jim Salsman
01:14:13
If Congress remains deadlocked, should Biden declare a wide-ranging ongoing pandemic emergency funded with trillion dollar platinum coins to raise medical school enrollment caps?
Bruce Gilmor
01:17:45
Why no studies dealing with "super spreader" " sick buildings" to determine excessive spread rate, and to take immediate course of reduction action(s)?
Christina Oldini, CMQCC
01:19:10
Please discuss NIH funding disparity that exists for research focused on women and those that identify as women
Jim Salsman
01:21:40
Bruce, please see https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34689810/ industrial hygienists with HVAC skills are heavily in demand recently, but luckily they aren't subject to enrollment caps, beyond the fact that the high demand can incorrectly limit the proportion of effort devoted to training.
Bruce Gilmor
01:22:02
Thank you, once again.
Jim Salsman
01:26:42
Hayek consigned the former UK colonies to a very limited form of universal coverage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Hayek#Social_safety_nets the public option would basically upgrade us to the mediocre Australian system
Jim Salsman
01:27:40
I wish everyone would call Eshoo and ask her to request including the Japanese all-payer system in reconciliation
Petra Persson
01:34:33
@Eugene Lewit: Racial diversity in the physician workforce indeed has increased in the US. We know less about socioeconomic diversity. On racial diversity, we do have some excellent evidence on positive impacts. See Marcella Alsan’s important work on the positive impacts of racial diversity in the physician workforce.https://www.hks.harvard.edu/publications/does-diversity-matter-health-experimental-evidence-oakland
Petra Persson
01:34:49
@Michele Barry: Sweden does have less of a vocal anti-vax contingent at the upper end of the income distribution than the US does. (We don’t yet know about the Covid vaccine, so what I wrote here is not specifically about the Covid vaccine.) I think that you are right that when it comes to vaccines, collective trust is absolutely essential.
Sahil Tembulkar
01:37:00
Thanks!
Liz Chin
01:37:08
Thank you! Great panel!