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Nature, Power, and Race: a Book Discussion w/ Jacob Dlamini - Shared screen with speaker view
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
10:15
ha ha, love this song choice!
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
10:24
*ironically* of course :)))
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
10:38
eeek! didn't realize that went to everyone!
Venolia Rabodiba (she/her)
10:50
LOL
Laura Hubbard
11:46
Welcome everyone! As you settle in feel free to introduce yourselves in the chat. We are delighted you are here with us today.
liz jacob (she/her)
14:02
Hello everyone, my name is Liz Jacob. I’m a PhD candidate in African History at Stanford and graduate coordinator of the Producing Knowledge In and Of Africa workshop.
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
15:59
sorry I can't unmute
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
16:02
go ahead Jacob!
Joel Samoff
17:42
Joel Samoff, Center for African Studies. Welcome back, Jacob.
Chepchirchir
19:06
Chepchirchir Tirop, PhD Student in History. Excited to be here!
Christian Nguetse
19:47
Christian Nguetse, Postdoc from the Pediatrics department in the School of Medicine. Happy to be here!
Jasmine Reid
20:32
Jasmine Reid, PhD Student in Anthropology. Excited for this talk!
Laura Martin
21:22
Laura J Martin, Assistant Prof of Environmental Studies at Williams College, Fellow at Stanford Humanities Center this year. Glad to be with you virtually.
Ayanda
22:04
Ayanda Mahlaba, PhD student in History. From South Africa. 🇿🇦
j'nese williams
23:36
J'Nese Williams, Postdoc - Stanford Humanities Center
Mahlatse
23:48
Mahlatse Mashala, financial economics student at UCT in South Africa
Susan McConnell
23:55
Susan McConnell, Professor in the Department of Biology, Stanford.
natayafriedan
24:18
Nataya Friedan, PhD Candidate, Stanford Anthropology
Gabrielle Hecht (she/elle/ella)
24:44
Gabrielle Hecht, faculty in History, Anthro, and elsewhere. Very glad to hear about your new work, Jacob!
Alexa Russo
26:14
Alexa Russo, PhD candidate in Anthropology at Stanford
Laura Hubbard
27:29
This chat is warming our hearts -welcome! Please begin to put your questions into the Q/A so we can engage them in our discussion today.
Denise Lim
28:27
Denise Lim, lecturer in Sociology at Yale University. Familiar with Jacob’s past work given my research interests in SA, and excited about this new book!
Laura Armstrong
29:06
For us you have not read the book, can you just go through the timeline of Kruger. Were Black Africans excluded from the park during colonialization?
Shantanu Nevrekar
29:19
Shantanu Nevrekar, PhD student in Anthropology at Stanford University
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
31:11
never legally/formally - they were not allowed to use restcamps and other facilities but could stay if they "made their own way"
M'Imwonyo Mbui
33:26
G.M. M"Imwonyo Mbui here; PhD student(Theology & Ethics) at Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley.
M'Imwonyo Mbui
35:54
Making interesting connections with the Kenyan situation, particularly on the "exclusion" component, whereby natives are relegated to the periphery as far as proximity to our wealth of national parks and reserves go.
Cullen Goldblatt
38:30
Cullen Goldblatt, Humanities faculty at Portland State University, Visiting Scholar at Columbia University, Literature scholar doing historiography. US/South African. Currently teaching Native Nostalgia and very glad to be here.
M'Imwonyo Mbui
38:33
In close connection, the commodification of local entertainers(principally Maasai warriors) to satiate exotic interests. I wonder how this scenario plays out SA
Denise Lim
39:18
^^ Yes!
Ayanda
45:31
I think Prof Dlamini is referring to RRR Dhlomo, not HIE Dhlomo.
Chepchirchir
47:07
The gramophone comment made me think of the latest sound installation in the Namib Desert
Susan McConnell
51:03
Thank you so much for your response!
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
01:03:17
I like Ayanda's question but not sure if you feeli t's abit off topic (not dealing with conservation specifically)
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
01:06:15
We love your question but there are so many in the queue we are trying to keep them focused on conservation issues in particular. but I agree, his definition of "blackness" is very interesting and worth probing!
Gina Haney
01:06:41
To build upon M’Imwonyo Mbui’s question. Could you elaborate on the commodification of culture within the context of the preserve? I am particularly interested in the commodification of culture in the township I.e., township tourism.
Gabrielle Hecht (she/elle/ella)
01:06:48
Some projects are just better pursued in a slow burn kind of way… :-)
Chepchirchir
01:07:10
Thank you for saying that Prof Dlamini
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
01:07:14
Yes indeed!
Ayanda
01:09:06
No worries at all! 😊
M'Imwonyo Mbui
01:09:12
A constant lament?!? Now that sounds intriguing; very interesting too!
Cullen Goldblatt
01:09:31
Especially one that began in the 1860s!
Ariel Phillips
01:10:18
Thanks for a wonderful event!
Laura Hubbard
01:10:19
I want to say that this chat has been wonderful to witness! So many thoughts and engaging reflections.
Joel Marie Cabrita (she/her/hers)
01:10:22
thank you Jacob and Venolia - fantastic discussion!
M'Imwonyo Mbui
01:10:55
Asante sana/Thanks all!
j'nese williams
01:10:56
Thank you!
Chepchirchir
01:10:59
Thank you! This was a great afternoon discussion.
Ayanda
01:11:03
Really insightful indeed. Thank you all! 🙏🏿