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08/11/20: Teaching in Autumn: Student Panel: 1:00 - 2:00 PM - Shared screen with speaker view
Graham Weaver
12:09
thank you so much to all the organizers and students - really looking forward to the panel!!
James Lattin
12:41
Hello from Menlo Park!
Graham Weaver
13:10
Hey from Marin
demarest
13:25
I’m in Vail Colorado (david demarest)
Andrea Taylor
13:27
Hi from San Francisco
Sven Beiker
13:29
Palo Alto, just off of campus
Neha Dalal
13:29
Hi from Boston!
Abby Braiman
13:31
LOS ANGELESSSSSS because apparently I’m trying to boost my immunity
joseph morcos
13:47
Hello from College Terrace!
Corey Longhurst
13:52
Hi, from Chicago!
James Lattin
13:55
Stay safe Abby!
Ken Shotts
14:17
Hi. (all the way from faculty housing on campus)
stephen johnson
14:27
San Francisco
Debra
15:17
San Francisco
joshua rauh
15:23
Hi all, I'm at home at Stanford. Thanks for doing this panel.
Graham Weaver
28:03
Regarding breakout rooms - I have heard mixed things from students. What should we make sure to avoid when using breakout rooms?
Alison Brauneis
30:07
@graham - thank you for your question. We have noted it for the Q&A period
Neha Dalal
30:30
@Professor Weaver–as an initial answer, I’d recommend avoiding breakout rooms with vague guidance on what should be discussed or those that are too long.
Graham Weaver
31:20
Thank you @Neha
Corey Longhurst
33:07
@Professor Weaver - I think ensuring everyone has a baseline of context is also helpful. It's helpful to have class wide discussions and use the breakout rooms to go deeper. I found that when we started out class with breakout rooms, students have different levels of preparation. This could really hinder discussion. When that happens, we typically just chit-chatted instead of focusing on the question being asked.
Graham Weaver
35:52
Thank you @Corey! Didn't think about that.
Bianca Jackson
37:31
+1, Neha!!!
Abby Braiman
37:52
For real the number of tabs I had open at once became a prison of my own creation
Neha Dalal
40:32
+1 Abby on stretch briggs!
Neha Dalal
40:37
breaks*
James Lattin
40:47
+1 on not being 20 anymore!!
Alyssa Rapp
41:12
😂 @ Jim
Corey Longhurst
41:15
+1, Abby.
Corey Longhurst
41:17
lol
Ken Shotts
41:29
<laughing at the reduction in spryness during one’s 20s…just wait a couple of decades>
James Lattin
43:39
Not an urgent question, but something the panelists might address if there is time: I'm interested in what is the best way to process learning AFTER coming back from Breakout Rooms? Any tips on best practice?
Bianca Jackson
44:18
+1 Neha on chat feature, both for in depth conversation as well as fun quips that keep people engaged!
joseph morcos
46:44
@James, some professors told us in advance they'd be calling on 1 rep from each room to overview what the group talked about, after the chat ends, and then did a round-robin...it wasn't perfect, but helped add some pressure to actually have a productive conversation
Amber Levine
47:59
+1 James on the best way to process learning after breakout rooms
Corey Longhurst
49:19
@Jim Lattin, I think a google sheet for each group to jot down their topline answer would be helpful. With the sheet, you can call out group representatives to share what's helpful.
Bianca Jackson
51:55
Adding onto that, Corey, then perhaps bringing everyone together with bullets written live on a slide
Ken Shotts
54:11
It seems to me that participation in Zoom could be broader than in-person (especially building on chat). But it also could be narrower. What techniques did faculty use that were effective in promoting broad participation?
Gloria Lee
54:43
wondering if anyone had experiences with using other engagement tools such as: the annotation feature in zoom, comments in google docs, polleverywhere…?
Graham Weaver
58:27
What's too long? 15 min?
Abby Braiman
59:15
agree with Neha - 5 min is a good threshold
joseph morcos
59:28
For me, 10+ probably too long
Neha Dalal
59:39
Unless it was a specific, longer task. But for just discussion 5-10 min.
James Lattin
01:00:43
I like the idea of using Google Slides so that everyone can see what was written in different rooms.
joseph morcos
01:00:57
@James also gives prof a sense of when groups are finalizing task
James Lattin
01:01:47
Thanks!
Ken Shotts
01:03:09
thank you. my computer screen froze as you called on me!
Abby Braiman
01:03:25
^ we celebrate and laugh together at technical difficulties!
demarest
01:04:06
Did any faculty use personal stories from their own experiences related to the subject matter and were those effective ways to engage. Does storytelling work in a zoom setting? Or humor?
Abby Braiman
01:04:16
^YES
Abby Braiman
01:04:20
Happy to speak on that more
James Lattin
01:04:29
Google Sheet also helps faculty member to pick people who have a thoughtful point of view (can't always tell from just a raised hand).
Abby Braiman
01:04:31
we love personal stories and humor
Neha Dalal
01:05:11
^+100
James Lattin
01:06:11
I thought having the students vote with YES/NO buttons in Zoom worked just fine.
Abby Braiman
01:06:14
Often actually one of the hardest things about Zoom class is we don’t get to see the professor’s personalities in the same way because there’s less banter / informal time before or after class or so on, and I definitely miss that. A lot of business school for me, at least, is about relationship building
James Lattin
01:07:24
+1 Corey
James Lattin
01:08:26
REALLY hard to get feedback (laughing, body language, etc.) over Zoom.
Neha Dalal
01:11:31
I like that @joseph
Graham Weaver
01:13:12
Thank you all so much - this was immensely helpful!!!!
Ken Shotts
01:13:14
Thank you all for taking the time…it’s very helpful for us as we invest in preparing.
James Lattin
01:13:18
Thank you panelists!
James Lattin
01:13:25
Thank you T&LHub!
Mary Barth
01:13:30
Thank you students!!!
Juliane Begenau
01:13:32
Thank you everyone! Very useful
joseph morcos
01:13:35
Great to be here! Thanks for all your commitment to making lemonade out of lemons! :)
Abby Braiman
01:13:37
thank YOU all! Having you all join makes me more excited for the Fall and classes
Jungho Choi
01:13:40
Thank you very much, panelists!
joshua rauh
01:13:42
Thanks to all the panelists, really appreciate your thoughts!
Corey Longhurst
01:13:46
Thanks everyone. Great being here.
Bianca Jackson
01:13:47
Thank YOU to all of you for joining and all this prep! We are so excited for classes to begin!
Gloria Lee
01:13:48
Thanks everyone for the terrific insights!
Neha Dalal
01:13:54
Thank you all for everything you do for us studnets!!!
Mark Voorsanger
01:13:58
Thank you everyone!
demarest
01:14:00
This was great. Thanks to all.
takuo sugaya
01:14:01
Thank you very much!
Alison Brauneis
01:14:07
http://tiny.cc/Aug11StudentPanel
stephen johnson
01:14:08
What one piece of advice would you have for a lecturer who DOESNT have a TA?
Nir Halevy
01:14:12
Thank you everyone. Super helpful!
Alison Brauneis
01:14:18
We would appreciate hearing your thoughts on this session: http://tiny.cc/Aug11StudentPanel
Debra
01:14:26
How was it having conversations on sensitive topics?
Debra
01:14:34
Over zoom
Scotty McLennan
01:15:11
Terrific panel. Many thanks!
demarest
01:15:40
This is the third session I’ve watched (zoom basics, faculty panel, student panel). What has been helpful is to hear the themes that are common about engagement, use of chat, stories, etc.
demarest
01:25:30
Thanks again!