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Environmental Justice Colloquium - Shared screen with speaker view
Jessica Mi
20:38
Welcome everyone! The song playing is “American Dream” by Raye ZaragozaRaye Zaragoza is a Japanese-American, Mexican, Indigenous musician dedicated to celebrating voices and histories in a country where for many, simply existing is political. In "American Dream", Zaragoza laments and grieves atrocities in this country, both in headlines and within her histories, yet calls on her ancestors to find strength to believe "that change is a choice, and it can start with me." https://www.rayezaragoza.com/
Sibyl Diver
21:14
Welcome everyone! We’re just gathering.
Sibyl Diver
24:26
AGENDAEnvironmental and Racial Justice: How We Survive and ThriveFourth Annual EJ Symposium at Stanford, 2021 (virtual)Panel 1 (11-12pm). Indigenous Leadership and Scholarship for Land BackPanel 2 (12-1pm). EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangePanel 3 (1-2pm). Community Leadership for Climate Resilience
Sibyl Diver
25:39
THANK YOU! Intro to Environmental Justice course & its supportershttps://www.ejstanford.com/Haas Center for Public Service,https://haas.stanford.edu/Earth Systems Programhttps://earth.stanford.edu/esys#gs.fo4xahProgram in Writing and Rhetorichttps://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr
Sibyl Diver
28:04
Actions to consider — please feel free to add!https://native-land.ca/https://sogoreate-landtrust.org/Kipukakuleana.org
Sibyl Diver
28:32
https://www.kipukakuleana.org/
Sibyl Diver
29:32
Dr. Mehana Blaich Vaughan grew up where the moku (districts) of Halele‘a and Ko‘olau meet on the island of Kaua‘i. She worked as a middle and high school teacher on Kauaʻi and Oʻahu, developing programs connecting students and their learning to ʻāina. Now, Mehana is an Associate Professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, and Sea Grant College Program. She is part of a hui of Native Hawaiian faculty helping Hawaiʻi communities to care for and govern the places that sustain them. Mehanaʻs first book, "Kaiāulu, Gathering Tides" was published in 2018. It is based on 20 years of interviews with Kauaʻi kūpuna and community members sharing stories of fishing and the kuleana that come with being from a place. Mehana lives in Kīlauea with her husband, mother, and three children ages thirteen, eleven and almost nine. https://www.kipukakuleana.org/, http://mehanavaughan.huiainamomona.org/
Sibyl Diver
30:50
Dr. Beth Rose Middleton Manning is a Professor of Native American Studies at UC Davis. She grew up in the rural Sierra Nevada foothills in northern California, Miwuk country, and she is passionate about environmental health and rural environmental justice. Her research and teaching center Native environmental policy and Native activism for site protection and stewardship, and her broader research interests include African and Indigenous intersections in the Americas, intergenerational trauma and healing, and Indigenous analyses of climate change. Beth Rose has written two books: Trust in the Land: New Directions in Tribal Conservation (UA Press 2011), on Native applications of conservation easements, and Upstream (UA Press 2018), on the history of Indian allotment lands at the headwaters of the California State Water Project. She lives in Patwin homelands in Davis, CA, with her husband and son, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens. https://nas.ucdavis.edu/people/beth-middleton
Sibyl Diver
54:15
Panel 1: Indigenous Leadership and Scholarship for Land BackMehana Vaughan, Kipuka Kuleana, https://www.kipukakuleana.org/, http://mehanavaughan.huiainamomona.org/, mehana@hawaii.eduBeth Rose Middleton Manning, UC Davis, Department of Native American Studies https://nas.ucdavis.edu/people/beth-middleton, brmiddleton@ucdavis.eduKeoni Rodriguez (moderator), https://stanfordnativestud.wixsite.com/student-groups/hawai-i-club-hui-o-hawai-i,https://sustainus.org/people/josiah-keoni-rodriguez/, keoni57@stanford.edu
Emily Polk
55:16
Please feel free to put your questions in the chat!
Ky Friedman (he/him)
55:49
To Dr. Middleton, you mentioned very briefly studying Indigenous languages in university settings. Could you speak to the value of Indigenous languages in climate science and how teaching such languages could be done repectfully and effectively?
Sibyl Diver
01:03:19
https://www.amazon.com/Kaiaulu-Gathering-Mehana-Blaich-Vaughan/dp/087071922X
Sibyl Diver
01:04:24
https://www.amazon.com/Books-Beth-Rose-Middleton-Manning/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3ABeth+Rose+Middleton+Manning
Sarah Barger
01:05:19
All of the proceeds from Mehana’s book Kaiaulu go to our nonprofit Kipuka Kuleana :) We appreciate your support!
Beth Rose Middleton
01:06:58
Royalties from “Upstream” and “Trust in the Land” go to Maidu organizations and to Native land trusts, respectively.
Doug Klink (he/him)
01:09:49
to Mehana: could you talk about Aloha, the idea of having a welcoming community, in the context of being overrun by outsiders? If you could wave a wand, would you bar these people from moving in, or is that against community values? How do you reckon with that tension?
Mehana Vaughan
01:09:56
Beth Roseʻs books are so so excellent, beautifully written and amazingly deeply teaching!
Beth Rose Middleton
01:11:17
Thank you Mehana. 💗I just recommended Kaiaulu to a group yesterday! It is so powerful, from the heart, and inspires solidarity.
Sibyl Diver
01:14:10
https://www.maidusummit.org/
Sibyl Diver
01:14:11
https://sogoreate-landtrust.org/
Sibyl Diver
01:14:27
http://amahmutsun.org/land-trust
Sibyl Diver
01:14:47
https://www.kipukakuleana.org/
Sibyl Diver
01:15:17
THANK YOU! Panel 1: Indigenous Leadership and Scholarship for Land BackMehana Vaughan, Kipuka Kuleana, https://www.kipukakuleana.org/, http://mehanavaughan.huiainamomona.org/, mehana@hawaii.eduBeth Rose Middleton Manning, UC Davis, Department of Native American Studies https://nas.ucdavis.edu/people/beth-middleton, brmiddleton@ucdavis.eduKeoni Rodriguez (moderator), https://stanfordnativestud.wixsite.com/student-groups/hawai-i-club-hui-o-hawai-i,https://sustainus.org/people/josiah-keoni-rodriguez/, keoni57@stanford.edu
Sibyl Diver
01:15:37
UP NEXT! Panel 2: EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangeVeronica Chambers , Narrative Projects for the New York Times https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers, veronica@lightbulbink.comNaveena Sadasiva, Grist.org, https://www.texasobserver.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/, nsadasivam@grist.orgEric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara, esagara@stanford.eduDarel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/about, darel@earthincolor.coEmily Polk (moderator), Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford, https://www.empolk.com/, empolk@stanford.edu
Holmes Hummel (they / them)
01:15:43
The pursuit of environmental justice in the context of land back work is deeply humbling, and a great privilege to learn about through your experience and expertise. Thank you, Mehana and Beth Rose, for lighting the way through your scholarship and depth of human connection and community engagement in your work.
evelyn kuo (she/her)
01:16:09
Thank you Dr. Mehana, Dr. Beth Rose, and Keoni!
Mehana Vaughan
01:16:10
Thank you Holmes.. I teach all my graduate students to work with their advisors as you taught us to!
Kathryn, Kyra, and Evan
01:16:12
Thank you so much!
PJ
01:16:21
Thank you to all of you. Mahalo!
natalie cross
01:16:26
Thank you!!
Emily Polk
01:16:27
Thank you so so much! This was deeply inspiring!
Jeremy Rubin (he/him)
01:16:32
Thank you so much!
valory banashek
01:16:33
Thank you Beth and Mehana!
Mehana Vaughan
01:16:37
Suki Hoagland.. mahalo for being such teacher and mentor to me..
Mehana Vaughan
01:16:47
Mahalo kākou…
Marina Luccioni
01:17:00
Mahalo nui Mehana and Beth Rose!!!
Sam Mickens
01:17:37
This is great. I've learned so much already.
Esther Conrad
01:18:03
Thank you so much, Mehana, Beth, and Keoni - that was beautiful!
Mel Vierra
01:18:18
wonderful presentation!
Mehana Vaughan
01:18:26
Mahalo all.
aisling murran
01:18:35
Thank you to everyone who made this possible! Very informative, personal and amazing! Thank you
Jessica Mi
01:19:21
“Sage Up” by Xiuhtezcatl MartinezXiuhtezcatl Martinez is an “indigenous eco hip hop artist, activist and spokesperson.” He has advocated for climate and environmental justice globally both through powerful speeches at conferences, and through his music. “Sage Up” brings a Lakota elder’s singing in conversation with Xiuhetezcatl’s rap of indigenous resistance. https://xiuhtezcatl.com/
Mehana Vaughan
01:19:37
Mahalo for this great forum, Sibyl and Emily and Keoni and everyone, you all are amazing, excited for next session…
Heather Lukacs
01:19:51
So wonderful to see so many of you. And, thank-you, Mehana and Beth Rose. <3
stace maples
01:21:45
That was great!
Sibyl Diver
01:22:18
AGENDAEnvironmental and Racial Justice: How We Survive and ThriveFourth Annual EJ Symposium at Stanford, 2021 (virtual)Panel 1 (11-12pm). Indigenous Leadership and Scholarship for Land BackPanel 2 (12-1pm). EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangePanel 3 (1-2pm). Community Leadership for Climate Resilience
Sibyl Diver
01:22:34
Panel 2: EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangeVeronica Chambers , Narrative Projects for the New York Times https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers, veronica@lightbulbink.comNaveena Sadasiva, Grist.org, https://www.texasobserver.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/, nsadasivam@grist.orgEric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara, esagara@stanford.eduDarel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/about, darel@earthincolor.coEmily Polk (moderator), Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford, https://www.empolk.com/, empolk@stanford.edu
Sibyl Diver
01:24:45
Naveena Sadasivam is a staff writer covering the environment, energy, and climate change at Grist. She previously covered environmental issues at the Texas Observer, InsideClimate News and ProPublica. At ProPublica, she was part of a team that reported on the water woes of the West, a project that was a 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist for national reporting. She is also a Livingston award finalist and has received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Online News Association, and Society of Environmental Journalists for her reporting. She has a master’s in environmental and science reporting from New York University and an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. https://grist.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/page/17/?utm_source=syndication&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=grist
Sibyl Diver
01:26:37
https://grist.org/equity/ab617-richmond-california-chevron-refinery-air-monitoring/
Sibyl Diver
01:36:09
Shout out to Andres Soto on the front page from CBE!https://www.cbecal.org/
Sibyl Diver
01:37:23
Veronica Chambers is an award-winning author and the lead editor of Narrative Projects, a team dedicated to telling multi-platform stories at The New York Times. Based in London, her most recent book is “Call and Response: The Story of Black Lives Matter.” She has taught writing at several colleges and universities including at Stanford. Born in Panama and raised in Brooklyn, she writes often about her Afro-Latina heritage. https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers
Sibyl Diver
01:37:37
https://www.amazon.com/Call-Response-Story-Black-Matter/dp/0358573416
Stephanie Fischer
01:37:57
Sí Afro-Latinidad!!
Veronica Chambers
01:38:13
https://climatehub.nytimes.com/session/678917/climate-justice-means-racial-justice
Emily Polk
01:40:27
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/08/31/sports/black-surfers.html
Emily Polk
01:42:37
Please mute yourself if you are not already! Thank you so much!
Emily Polk
01:43:31
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/09/20/multimedia/black-national-park-rangers.html
Sydney Schmitter
01:44:31
This is incredible!
Jessica Mi
01:45:55
I love this, thank you so much for sharing Veronica!
Emily Polk
01:46:16
So much joy…
Sarah Barger
01:46:29
We need this documentary to happen!
Alexis Wilson
01:47:08
Where can we find the link to the Black Gardeners piece?
Sibyl Diver
01:49:27
Panel 2: EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangeVeronica Chambers , Narrative Projects for the New York Times https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers, veronica@lightbulbink.comNaveena Sadasiva, Grist.org, https://www.texasobserver.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/, nsadasivam@grist.orgEric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara, esagara@stanford.eduDarel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/about, darel@earthincolor.coEmily Polk (moderator), Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford, https://www.empolk.com/, empolk@stanford.edu
Sibyl Diver
01:50:30
Eric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara,Eric Sagara is a data journalist with Big Local News. Before coming to Big Local News, Sagara was on the data team at Reveal and the Center for Investigative Reporting. His work covered wildfires, climate change, racial disparities in policing and high female incarceration rates in Oklahoma. He has also held a news applications fellowship at ProPublica, where he worked on projects about pharmaceutical payments to doctors, deadly force in police agencies and the trail of guns in the United States. Prior to that, he was a reporter on The Newark Star-Ledger's data team where he helped document the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Sagara is originally from Arizona, where he reported on business, education, crime and government.
richard nevle
01:50:32
Thank you Veronica, so lovely to see your face—and so moving to hear about the joy and challenges of this recent work.
Sibyl Diver
01:51:45
LINK to Veronica’s multifaceted work! https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/us/black-history-continued.html
Veronica Chambers
01:51:57
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/26/special-series/black-gardeners-pandemic.html.
Sibyl Diver
01:53:09
Thank you!
Sibyl Diver
01:53:23
https://openpolicing.stanford.edu/
Sibyl Diver
02:01:12
https://openpolicing.stanford.edu/explore/
Sibyl Diver
02:02:33
https://www.inquirer.com/news/philadelphia-city-council-isaiah-thomas-police-driving-while-black-20211014.html
Sibyl Diver
02:03:19
Panel 2: EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangeVeronica Chambers , Narrative Projects for the New York Times https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers, veronica@lightbulbink.comNaveena Sadasiva, Grist.org, https://www.texasobserver.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/, nsadasivam@grist.orgEric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara, esagara@stanford.eduDarel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/about, darel@earthincolor.coEmily Polk (moderator), Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford, https://www.empolk.com/, empolk@stanford.edu
Sibyl Diver
02:03:38
Darel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/aboutDarel Scott is the founder of Earth in Color, an emerging creative studio and media platform focused on Black culture, community healing, and the environment. Through creative storytelling and nature experiences, Earth in Color affirms Black cultural connections to the natural world and helps its growing community of Black early adults lead healthy, sustainable lives. Darel is currently incubating Earth in Color at Grist as their first-ever Entrepreneur in Residence. She received her master's from Stanford University in 2019 in Sustainability Science and Practice and her bachelor's in Earth Systems. Follow Earth in Color's journey at www.earthincolor.co and @earthincolor.co on Instagram.
Christopher LeBoa
02:05:07
Is there a way to subscribe to the new magazine !?
Sibyl Diver
02:05:45
YES! Scroll down here: https://www.earthincolor.co/radicle
Kathryn, Kyra, and Evan
02:08:11
Yay Steph!! <3
Stephanie Fischer
02:08:20
Ayo! Amazing work Darel <3
lora supandi
02:10:25
wow, this is beautiful
Naveena Sadasivam
02:11:30
As someone who has a copy of radicle, I can attest to just how beautifully designed and engaging the magazine is! Pick up a copy, you won’t be disappointed!!
richard nevle
02:11:45
This story just gets more beautiful each time I hear it.
Vanesa Donangtavanh
02:12:03
Amazing!
Emily Polk
02:12:29
If you have questions for these amazing panelists please put them the chat now!
Vanesa Donangtavanh
02:14:16
How do you keep true to who you are and stay creative when the standards of the world pushes you to fit into their structure?
aisling murran
02:14:27
Thank you!
Sibyl Diver
02:15:00
THANK YOU!!! Panel 2: EJ Storytelling for Transformative ChangeVeronica Chambers , Narrative Projects for the New York Times https://climatehub.nytimes.com/speaker/344088/veronica-chambers, veronica@lightbulbink.comNaveena Sadasiva, Grist.org, https://www.texasobserver.org/author/naveena-sadasivam/, nsadasivam@grist.orgEric Sagara, BigLocalNews@Stanford, https://biglocalnews.org, https://muckrack.com/esagara, esagara@stanford.eduDarel Scott, Earth in Color, Radicle Magazine https://www.earthincolor.co/about, darel@earthincolor.coEmily Polk (moderator), Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford, https://www.empolk.com/, empolk@stanford.edu
Juanita Fonseca
02:15:06
Great question, Vanesa!!
Alexis Wilson
02:15:10
For Darel- Is Radicle in a physical format (and how do people gain access to it?) or is it only available digitally?
Alexis Wilson
02:15:47
follow-up question- how do you think the format of the magazine informs the work/how the message comes across to readers?
Darel Scott
02:17:29
Many of the stories in Radicle can be read on our website! https://www.earthincolor.co/radicle
Claire Thompson
02:18:17
So sorry to have to leave this incredible panel early. Thank you everyone for sharing!! 💚
richard nevle
02:18:19
What an amazing, powerful, and inspiring panel. Thank you all!!!
Vanesa Donangtavanh
02:19:34
THANK YOU SO MUCH
Sibyl Diver
02:19:38
UP NEXT! Panel 3: Community Leadership for Climate ResilienceViolet Wulf-Saena, Climate Resilient Communities, https://www.climatercommunities.org/staff violet.saena@crc.acterra.orgCecilia Taylor and Julie Shanson, Belle Haven Action, https://www.bellehavenaction.org/about-us.html, ctaylor@bellehavenaction.orgEver Rodriguez, North Fair Oaks Community Alliance, https://northfoca.org/founders/, erodriguez@northfoca.orgStephanie Fischer (moderator), Stanford Woods Institute, Behavioral Decisions in the Environment, https://decisionsenvironment.stanford.edu/person/stephanie-fischer, fischer9@stanford.edu
natalie cross
02:19:57
Thank you!!
Kathryn, Kyra, and Evan
02:20:03
Thank you all so much for your powerful stories and energy!
valory banashek
02:20:04
Thank you so much!!
regina kong (she/her)
02:20:09
thank you! so inspiring.
Juanita Fonseca
02:20:16
Thank you so much! It was very inspiring
Stephanie Fischer
02:20:49
“Yo soy de un pueblo sencillo” / “(I am from a simple town)” by Luis Enrique Meija Godoy.Luis Enrique Meija Godoy is a Nicaraguan singer, composer, and activist . Many of his songs are dedicated to the youth of Nicaragua to dream of a better future, and often writes images of his people enjoying the fruits of his country’s natural beauty. In “Yo soy de un pueblo sencillo”, Godoy mentions that although his town may be small, being united makes them more powerful than “un volcán”, or volcano. https://www.luisenriquemejiagodoy.com
Kathryn Catlin (she/hers)
02:20:57
I have to go, but thank you so much for organizing this! All speakers have been fantastic.
Sibyl Diver
02:21:57
Stephanie — the music!!! THANK YOU!!!
Darel Scott
02:22:18
Also, @Alexis - I think the magazine format provides a more potent experience of the stories that you don’t necessarily get online because it creates more space for one to mull over the content. That said, online has broader reach and is more accessible.
Sibyl Diver
02:24:54
Panel 3: Community Leadership for Climate ResilienceViolet Wulf-Saena, Climate Resilient Communities, https://www.climatercommunities.org/staff violet.saena@crc.acterra.orgCecilia Taylor and Julie Shanson, Belle Haven Action, https://www.bellehavenaction.org/about-us.html, ctaylor@bellehavenaction.orgEver Rodriguez, North Fair Oaks Community Alliance, https://northfoca.org/founders/, erodriguez@northfoca.orgStephanie Fischer (moderator), Stanford Woods Institute, Behavioral Decisions in the Environment, https://decisionsenvironment.stanford.edu/person/stephanie-fischer, fischer9@stanford.edu
Sibyl Diver
02:26:30
Cecilia Taylor is a third-generation resident of Menlo Park with a passion for education and social equity. In the spring of 2017, she founded Belle Haven Action, a group focusing on advocacy, oversight, and support for the Belle Haven community. Since then, Belle Haven Action has become a trusted organization in the neighborhood that residents rely on for information. Belle Haven Action's projects have included “breakfast at the bus stop” for students with long commutes to school, assisting seniors to sign up and complete applications for affordable housing, and providing COVID-19 testing and vaccination. In 2018, Cecilia was elected to the Menlo Park City Council in a historic election, the first Black woman to serve on the council in the city's history and the first Belle Haven resident on the council since 1986. Cecilia served as mayor of Menlo Park in 2020.
Sibyl Diver
02:26:39
Julie Shanson began her professional career in the development office at Stanford and held several customer facing roles in the technology industry before turning to nonprofit work. She serves as the Strategic Partnerships Manager for Belle Haven Action. Belle Haven Action, https://www.bellehavenaction.org/about-us.html
Peggy Cabrera
02:31:14
what tool did you use to generate the tree cover for these areas?
Sibyl Diver
02:33:51
Violet Wulf-Saena has served as an international climate change expert for over 10 years, and has worked with various groups in Less Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island States (SIDS) to protect communities from the impacts of climate change. Violet’s dedication to elevating community leadership and response to environmental justice is rooted from her lived experiences in the South-Pacific. She now works in the Bay Area in partnership with the government sector, research institutions, and community-based organizations, building community capacity to respond to climate change and sea-level rise.
Sibyl Diver
02:34:01
While completing her Master’s degree at Duke University, Violet began working with Acterra, building collaboration and partnerships with communities to raise awareness on the importance of a collaborative approach to adaptation and mainstreaming community lead solutions. Violet earned her Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of the South Pacific in Fiji. She also earned a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Management from Dresden University in Germany, a Postgraduate Diploma in Climate Change Urban Management Tools from Erasmus University in the Netherlands, a Proficiency Certificate in Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessments on Climate Change from Waikato University in New Zealand, and a Master’s in Environmental Management at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment in North Carolina. violet.saena@crc.acterra.org https://www.climatercommunities.org/staff
Annielka Pérez
02:34:41
OEHHA Website using the mapping tool and CalEnviroScreen 4.0
Annielka Pérez
02:34:46
https://oehha.ca.gov/calenviroscreen/report/calenviroscreen-40
Annielka Pérez
02:36:04
Great question, Peggy. Thanks
Sibyl Diver
02:38:44
Everardo (Ever) Rodriguez has been a resident of North Fair Oaks (NFO) for over 25 years, and has been doing community work for over 20 years with various Bay Area non-profit organizations, including the Green Branch Library (which provided social justice library materials for children), El Tecolote (San Francisco’s oldest bilingual newspaper), the Stanford-Puente-Pescadero project (a Stanford School of Education interpretation program for immigrants in Pescadero, CA), and the Climate Ready North Fair Oaks collaborative effort to advance equity and environmental justice.
Sibyl Diver
02:39:01
Ever has served on the North Fair Oaks Council since 2015 and was the Chairman for four years. His education includes an MA in Library & Information Science from San Jose State University, and he works for the Stanford University Libraries. He is part of the Bay Area’s letterpress printing community, and part of a traditional Mexican music coalition with members from all over the Bay Area who support cultural events and activism. Through his community activism, Ever is working to improve marginalized communities’ quality of life and enhancing opportunities for advancement in education, health, labor, housing, emergency preparedness, the environment, and other essential human needs.
Sibyl Diver
02:39:15
https://northfoca.org/founders/
Stephanie Fischer
02:42:40
Please send any questions you have for our panelists in the chat!
Alexandra Heaney
02:43:47
What do you think students should be taught about climate change and the importance of community voices in adaptation strategies?
Jessica Mi
02:49:23
Correct me if I’m wrong, but I imagine a challenge for these communities (NFO, EPA, Belle Haven) is that being situated in a place of such wealth like Silicon Valley, some Stanford students or the tech community may not be aware that these communities exist, or be unaware of how residents are struggling, even though Stanford and the tech industry are directly contributing to harm towards them. How do you as leaders advocate for your communities to those populations that may be disconnected from your lived experiences?
Jessica Mi
02:58:04
Building community infrastructure in addition to the physical
Evan, Kyra, and Kathryn
02:58:52
Thank you all so much for being here! I'm wondering about what community control over adaptation looks like. Violet you mentioned a "bottom-up" approach--what does that look like on the ground, and what structures get in the way of it?
Diane Bailey
02:59:11
Fossil Fuel pollution is one of the root causes of climate change, now causing so much misery and ongoing health impacts directly from the pollution. What are the best ways to talk about this that respect the fact that the corporate construct that created this disaster is far from impacted communities, yet residents continue to suffer the impacts? So how to we make the abstract concepts real and find the right words to talk about the health harms & alternatives?
Sibyl Diver
03:16:25
SYMPOSIUM RESOURCES DOC (ALL ARE WELCOME TO ADD THANKS!): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MgUQHMI5Q1ZDqi0YlD9XTTMiGzAnh22vokTAu95714E/edit?usp=sharing
Pam D Jones
03:20:08
Belle Haven is 18% of the population of Menlo Park.
Esther Conrad
03:20:58
Thank you all so much! This was such an inspiring and thoughtful discussion. The work you are doing is incredible. And thank you for moderating, Stephanie!
Emily Polk
03:21:21
Yes to everything Esther just wrote!! THANK YOU!!!
Pam D Jones
03:21:39
Thank-you all!!
Ever Rodriguez (he/el)
03:21:42
Thank you, it's an honor to have shared with you all.
olivia fu
03:21:43
Thank you to our panelists and moderators this was such an amazing symposium!
Emily Polk
03:21:45
Thank you to you Jessica!!
suki hoagland
03:21:47
What a wonderful symposium. Congratulations!
Asia Goode
03:21:56
Thank you
Oliver Nguyen (They/Them)
03:22:02
Thank you all!
Laura Tobar
03:22:03
Thank you all so much, such an amazing symposium!
Peggy Cabrera
03:22:18
gracias for all the information you shared about your work in your communities! you are inspiring!
Evan, Kyra, and Kathryn
03:22:19
Thank you all so much for all of the amazing conversations and insight!!
Jeremy Rubin (he/him)
03:22:21
Thank you for an incredible and insightful symposium!
Peter T Nguyen
03:22:23
thank you all!
Esther Conrad
03:22:37
Summer 2022 fellowships for Stanford graduate and undergraduate students will be available with the organizations represented on this panel! Descriptions will be ready by mid-December, and applications due on Feb. 1. If you’d like to receive an email when these opportunities are posted or have questions about these or other fellowship opportunities, please email me at esther@stanford.edu.These fellowships are as part of a new initiative investing in long-term partnerships with community leaders to address climate change, Partnerships for Climate Justice in the Bay Area:https://haas.stanford.edu/resources/community-partners/partnerships-climate-justice-bay-area
Kanika
03:23:03
Thank you for the incredible symposium!
Sibyl Diver
03:23:37
SUPPORT THESE POWERFUL COMMUNITY-LED ORGANIZATIONS!https://www.kipukakuleana.orghttps://www.climatercommunities.orghttps://www.bellehavenaction.orghttps://northfoca.orgALSO!https://sogoreate-landtrust.orghttp://amahmutsun.org/land-trusthttps://www.maidusummit.orgREAD AND GIVE BOOKS & MAGAZINES & NEWS!https://www.amazon.com/Books-Beth-Rose-Middleton-Manning/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3ABeth+Rose+Middleton+Manninghttps://www.amazon.com/Kaiaulu-Gathering-Mehana-Blaich-Vaughan/dp/087071922Xhttps://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/kai%C4%81uluhttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/us/black-history-continued.htmlhttps://www.earthincolor.co/radicle (Scroll to bottom!)
Sibyl Diver
03:23:51
LEARN MORE ABOUT STUDENT INTERNSHIPS (WILL BE POSTED IN MID-DECEMBER)!Partnerships for Climate Justice with North Fair Oaks Community Alliance, Climate Resilient Communities, Belle Haven Action: https://haas.stanford.edu/resources/community-partners/partnerships-climate-justice-bay-area,Email contact: Esther Conrad <esther@stanford.edu>STAY IN TOUCH WITH THE EJ WORKING GROUP AT STANFORD FOR MORE EVENTS LIKE THIS (JOIN OUR LISTSERV)!***Email listserv***: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/ejworkgroupWebsite: https://www.ejstanford.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/EJWGStanfordFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/EJWGStanford/