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Experiments in Learning: Mastery Learning (Cynthia Bailey Lee) - Shared screen with speaker view
dayo mitchell
11:10
This can wait to the end, but is there a paradox between maximizing choice and not taxing decision-making?
Kritika (she/her)
11:25
My exact question!
Melissa Ko
13:54
B
Kenny Ligda (he/him), CTL
13:59
C
Jamie Imam (she/her)
14:05
B
dayo mitchell
14:07
D
Gloriana Trujillo, CTL (she/her)
15:04
Addendum = heard of mastery learning, but maybe a different definition than I thought? Or misunderstood…
Lisa Hwang (she/her)
15:31
For this to work, do all assignments need to be mastery-based? For example, could you do this revise/resubmit exams but have traditional problem sets that are not revise/resubmit?
Kritika (she/her)
17:36
Great question, Lisa! I think Cynthia will be leaving time/space in a bit for questions and discussion so we’ll be sure this gets discussed! And Dayo’s question, as well as Gloriana’s point about different definitions of mastery learning.
Maite Camblor
25:37
Do students get any feedback other than the grade after each submission?
Kritika (she/her)
27:08
Nice question, Maite! Cynthia has a list of great questions ahead of her. :)
dayo mitchell
31:14
Is the Regrade Request per question or per exam?
Jamie Imam (she/her)
33:40
Overall, do you feel this is more/less/same work than “normal” for the class?
Gloriana Trujillo, CTL (she/her)
34:45
Did you assign any reflection assignments (or similar) to measure how well this approach worked for students each quarter?
Diane Lam (she/her), CTL
35:24
Do you have any data on which students participated in the regrade requests? (I’m thinking about how students who do extra credit are often the ones who don’t need it)
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
35:31
What are the advantages/disadvantages of revise/resubmit vs. having students complete a second assessment that uses similar problems/concepts to see whether the students can apply the comments/corrections they got in the first assessment to the second (similar but not identical) assessment?
dayo mitchell
39:16
I'm wondering if you had a critical mass of students repeating CS103 to study, would be interesting if so.
Melissa Ko
42:44
Applying to new problems may be exercising a different skill that you didn’t give feedback on
Diane Lam (she/her), CTL
43:34
Also maybe sometimes students feel like the new assessment is different and don’t try to understand what they did wrong on the first one?
Melissa Ko
44:08
Yeah experts are better at identifying that
Kritika (she/her)
44:44
+ 1 to Cynthia’s rationale. With essays, the skills being developed are around effective communication of the same ideas, so R&R makes more sense than changing the essay topic, for example.
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
45:47
In that case we are (mostly?) prompting students to improve the communication of their ideas, and not necessarily improving their ability to apply concepts/models
Kenny Ligda (he/him), CTL
47:02
What part of this do you think you’d like to make permanent? Or what tweaks do you think you’d like to make going forward?
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
47:55
Instead of (or on top of) revise and resubmit, have you considered using two-stage exams, like Carl Wieman?
Diane Lam (she/her), CTL
48:04
@Marcelo: Or maybe mastering that one problem will help them learning it better and prepare them to apply the concept to another context later? (Playing devil’s advocate here :) )
Kritika (she/her)
48:05
@Marcelo: Well, I don’t know about CS! And usually in humanities classes, there is more than one essay topic introduced in a single course. :) I was just speaking to why one would introduce R&R as a component at all, rather than simply increase the total number of essays written (each on a different topic).
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
48:18
That would reduce the regrade effort, and allow students to work collaboratively
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
49:34
Certainly, Kritika! Makes sense. I was thinking mostly from the perspective of economics, where application of concept/models and analysis of new situations is a critical aspect of what we want students to learn
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
49:58
Communication is very important too, so a combination of revise/resubmit and new problems would work for us
Kritika (she/her)
50:24
Agreed, Marcelo! Your question got me thinking about the rationale in the humanities, which I’m not sure I’d ever tried to articulate before! ❤️
Melissa Ko
51:51
I guess I see revise and resubmit less of a “choice” and more of flexibility and forgiveness
Gloriana Trujillo, CTL (she/her)
51:59
It was more a comment, no need to focus/stick to this point.
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
52:02
@Diane: mastering that one problem might work, unless students are incorporating suggestions without really internalizing them. For me, the test is whether students can apply what they've learned in a new situation
Melissa Ko
52:11
As opposed to having a major assessment, but then asking them to choose one of five different ways to do it
Lisa Hwang (she/her)
53:24
I think Emma B in CS has been using 2-stage exams as well
Jennifer Randall Crosby (she/her)
53:44
We know that too much choice is overwhelming, so we tried to add choice in Psych 1 within limits
Melissa Ko
53:55
Two-stage exams are great, though I think there is value in mastery learning for tracking individualized progression
Kritika (she/her)
55:10
@Jennifer: any details of how you introduced limits in Psych 1 that might be instructive here?
Lisa Hwang (she/her)
55:11
Yeah, I think the synchronous aspect is important for two-stage exams.
Jennifer Randall Crosby (she/her)
56:05
@Kritika - Sure I can explain on mic if it’s helpful.
dayo mitchell
59:31
Many paradoxes in the pandemic...
Kritika (she/her)
01:01:11
Nice wording … also gets at Gloriana’s earlier question about opportunities for students to reflect.
Kenny Ligda (he/him), CTL
01:01:35
Really like this reflection piece!
dayo mitchell
01:02:01
Thank you so much, that was wonderful, gotta run to a 2pm.
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
01:02:04
I like it too! Mainly for pedagogical reasons, but it could also eliminate the need to grade and regrade
Marcelo Clerici-Arias
01:03:32
Thank you so much for your presentation and your work on teaching and learning, Cynthia! It also led to a great conversation
Jennifer Randall Crosby (she/her)
01:03:42
Thanks!!!
Lisa Hwang (she/her)
01:03:45
Thank you, Cynthia!
Diane Lam (she/her), CTL
01:03:48
Thanks Cynthia! This was awesome
Melissa Ko
01:03:59
Thank you!!
Kenny Ligda (he/him), CTL
01:04:04
So much to think about here—thank you!